investment planning

Moving For a New Job? Consider the Costs

A job change is no longer just about higher pay or a better title. It can also be about achieving a healthier life balance or simply trying something new. In many cases, a new job includes relocating to a new community. A new opportunity can be very exciting, but even the most positive change comes with financial implications, especially when a move is involved. It’s good to understand the unexpected costs around relocating. A little knowledge can help you capitalize on the momentum of your new role without compromising your overall financial plan.

Put Your Eggs In Many Baskets

When their investment savings plummeted in the 2001 stock market crash, Adam and Sonya were concerned, but not panicked. Retirement was a long way out, so they had plenty of time to recover. The couple decided to try their hand at 'timing the market' (buying and selling stocks based on expected market fluctuations) to recover their losses. "We thought that if we stayed on top things and could chart when the market would go up and down, we could make our money back," says Adam.

History is a Good Teacher

Like many young adults, Lindsay took what her parents had to say with a grain of salt when it came to money. A new college graduate with an entry-level job, she was more interested in spending her paycheques than saving them. Saving was for later, she thought. Life was for living. When her father raised an eyebrow or offered advice, she brushed him off.

Then came the financial collapse of 2008. Lindsay lost her job and moved back into her parents' basement, regretting immediately almost every dollar she had blown.

Investing Smart During Uncertain Times

Warren Buffett has a classic rule when it comes to market volatility:

“Be fearful when others are greedy and greedy when others are fearful”.

Investor anxiety normally tends to rise in step with market volatility because most people are concerned about trying to pick the best time to buy or sell. For instance, making investment decisions would be infinitely easier if there was complete certainty about when markets were headed for a bear market or a correction.

The Difference Between Price and Profits

The recent market turmoil triggered by the COVID-19 virus (and its possible impact on economic activity) brings to mind some observations by legendary investor Warren Buffett. During his years of investing, he has famously stated that in the short-run (days, weeks, and months) the investment markets are a voting machine. People buy and sell investments based on price momentum, or their emotions regarding how comfortable they are with the price direction over a few days or weeks.

The Magic Wealth Ingredient

There is a legend about a successful financial advisor in Warren Buffett's stomping grounds of Omaha, Nebraska. It is reported that this advisor has learned the art of communicating the basics of wealth building with the local farmers. The advisor, who we will call Fred Smith, greets clients in his office with a window behind his desk that overlooks fields of blowing wheat and corn.

Be Prepared For Emergencies & Opportunities

Randy worked for a small business. When the owner died suddenly, the business accounts were frozen and it took several weeks before they could be accessed to meet payroll. Randy had trouble meeting his financial obligations and had to find a new job.

Jane worked at a small company for many years. When the owner decided to retire, she offered to sell the business to Jane. As she didn't have the funds available, the business was sold to someone else. The new owner let Jane go shortly after taking over.

Boomer Advice to Young People: Invest Early & Diversify

When asked if they had any regrets, Baby Boomers wished they had started investing and saving at a much earlier age. Hindsight being 20/20, the Boomer generation can pass on some much needed advice and guidance to their kids and grandkids. It is normal for younger people to focus on earning money to accommodate their lifestyle but few have the foresight to pay themselves first. It is easy for younger generations to imagine their whole life ahead of them and have the attitude that of course I'll be financially set when I'm ready to retire'.

Bad Excuses for Putting Off Investing

Recent college or university graduates with their first career job have an understandable itch to spend money after years of living on Kraft Dinner. The last thing they want to think about is saving money and building assets.

Yet this is the ideal time in life to start developing the correct habits that will lead to a comfortable lifestyle now and in the future. But what we often hear are the reasons why now is not the right time to get started. And you don't even need to watch how you spend every penny!

Here are five bad excuses for not investing:

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